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What Estate Planning Documents Should Everyone Have?

Western and Central Pennsylvania Estate Planning Law

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Estate Planning

What a Will Can and Cannot Do

A will allows you to distribute your worldly goods, select a guardian for minor children and name an executor to carry out your wishes.

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Pittsburgh trust lawyer
Estate Planning

When Should a Trust Be Reviewed?

Many people are under the impression that since they have a trust, they don’t need to do anything else. That’s not true. The trust you created years ago may not be appropriate for you now.

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Estate Planning

How Important Is an Estate Plan?

Every individual needs some form of an estate plan to protect their wishes and loved ones. Your estate consists of everything that you own (aka your assets), and although death may seem far away, it is never too soon to get your estate plan in order.

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Pittsburgh estate planning for families
Estate Planning

How Do I Plan with a Special Needs Child?

For parents who have a child with special needs, planning for their loved one’s life after they themselves are gone can be overwhelming. Breaking the process down into manageable parts and working with specialized professionals and companies can help.

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Beaver Retirement Planning Services
Estate Planning

Any Ideas How to Pay for Long-Term Care?

The costs of long-term care for older adults can be significant. Federal Medicare health insurance benefits do not cover most of these costs. Most people who incur costs for long-term care cover them with a combination of personal savings, long-term care insurance and Medicaid, among other sources.

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Estate Planning

TOD and POD Accounts: What’s the Difference?

A TOD account allows the account holder to name a beneficiary on a non-retirement financial account to receive assets at the time of the account holder’s death, thereby (generally – i.e., when used correctly) avoiding probate.

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